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  Unix Solaris  [ 182 result(s) ]
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  - Password does not decrypt secret key for unix.uid@variable  SUN
This message appears at login time when a user's password is not identical to the user's keylogin network password. When a system is running NIS+, the login program firstperforms UNIX authentication, and then attempts a keylogin(1) for secure RPC authentication.
To gain credentials for secure RPC, users can run keylogin (after login) and type in their secret key. To stop this message from appearing at login time, users can run the chkey -p command and set their network password to bethe same as their NIS+ password. If a user doesn't remember the network password, the system administrator should delete and re-create the user's credentials table entry so the user can establish a new network password with chkey.
UNIX SOLARIS
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  - Exec format error  SUN
This often happens when trying to runsoftware compiled for different systems or architectures, such as when executing Solaris 2.x programs on a SunOS 4.1.x system, or when trying to execute SPARC-specific programs on an x86 machine. On a Solaris 2.x system, it can also occur if the BinaryCompatibility Package was not installed.
Make sure that the software matches the architecture and system you're using. The file(1) command can help you determine the target architecture. If you're using SunOS 4.1.x softwareon a Solaris 2.x system, make sure that the Binary Compatibility Package is installed. You can check for it using this command: $ pkginfo | grep SUNWbcp A request was made to execute a file that, although it has the appropriate permissions, does not start with a valid format. The symbolic name for this error is ENOEXEC, errno=8. See the a.out(4) man page for a description of executable files.
UNIX SOLARIS
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  - SCSI bus DATA IN phase parity error  SUN
The most common cause of this problem is unapproved hardware. Some SCSI devices for thePC market do not meet the high I/O speed requirements for the UNIX market. Other possible causes of this problem are improper cabling or termination, and power fluctuations. Data corruption is possible but unlikely to occur, because this parity error prevents data transfer.
Check that all SCSI devices on the bus are Sun approved hardware. Then verify that all cables are no longer than six meters, total, and that all SCSI connections are properly terminated. If power fluctuations are occuring, invest in an uninterruptible power supply.
UNIX SOLARIS
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  - console login: ^J^M^Q^K^K^P  SUN
This usually occurs because OpenWindows exited abnormally, leaving the system's keyboard in the wrong mode. The characters that appear when someone attempts to login are garbage transliterations of what someone types.
Find another machine and remote login to this system, then run this command: $ /usr/openwin/bin/kbd_mode -a This puts the console back into ASCII mode. Note that kbd_mode is not a windows program, it just fixes the console mode. The usual reason for this problem occurring is an automated script run from cron that clears out the /tmp directory every so often. Ensure that any such scripts do not remove the /tmp/.X11- pipe or /tmp/.X11-unix directories, or any files therein.
UNIX SOLARIS
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  - WARNING: TOD clock not initialized-- CHECK AND RESET THE DATE!  SUN
This message indicates that the Time Of Day (TOD) clock reads zero, so its time is the beginning of the UNIX epoch: midnight 31 December 1969. On a brand-new system, the manufacturer might have neglected to initialize the system clock. On older systems it is more likely that the rechargeable battery has run out and requires replacement.
First replace the batteryaccording to the manufacturer's instructions. Then become superuser and use the date(1) command to set the time and date. On SPARC systems the clock is powered by the same battery as the NVRAM, so a dead battery also causes loss of the machine's Ethernet address and host ID, which are more serious problems for networked systems.
UNIX SOLARIS
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  - Watchdog Reset  SUN
This fatal error usually indicates some kind of hardware problem. Data corruption on the system is possible. Fix: Look for some other message that might help diagnose the problem. By itself, a watchdog reset doesn't provide enough information; because traps are disabled, all information has been lost. If all that appears on the console is an ok prompt, issue the PROM command below to view the final messages that occurred just before system failure:
ok f8002010 wector p Yes, that word iswector, not vector. The result is a display of messages similar to those produced by the dmesg(1M) command. These messages can be useful in finding the cause of system failure. This message doesn't come from the kernel, but from the OpenBoot PROM monitor, a piece of Forth software that gives you the ok prompt before you boot UNIX. If the CPU detects a trap when traps are disabled (an unrecoverable error), it signals a watchdog. The OpenBoot PROM monitor detects the watchdog, issues this message, and brings down the system.
UNIX SOLARIS
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  - SCSI transport failed: reason 'reset'  SUN
This message indicates that the system sent data over the SCSI bus, but the data never reached its destination because of a SCSI bus reset. The most common cause of this condition is conflicting SCSI targets.¤Data corruption is possible but unlikely to occur, because this failure prevents data transfer. Fix: Verify that all cables are no longer than six meters, total, and that all SCSI connections are properly terminated. If power surges are a problem, acquire a surge suppressor or uninterruptible power supply. A machine's internal disk drive is usually SCSI target 3. Make sure that external and secondary disk drives are targeted to 1, 2, or 0, and do not conflict with each other. Also make sure that tape drives are targeted to 4 or 5, and CD drives to 6, avoiding any conflict with each other or with disk drives. If the targeting of the internal disk drive is in question, power off the machine, remove all external drives, turn the power on, and from the PROM monitor run the probe-scsi-all or probe-scsi command.
If SCSI device targeting is acceptable, memory configuration could be the problem, especially for machines with the sun4c architecture. Ensure that high-capacity memory chips (such as 4MB SIMMs) are in lower banks, while lower-capacity memory chips (such as 1MB SIMMs) are in the upper banks. Note that SPARC systems do not always support third party CDROM drives, and might generate a similar "unknown vendor" error message. Check with the CDROM vendor for specific configuration requirements. Some third party disk drives have a read-ahead cache that interferes with Solaris device drivers. Make sure that any existing read-ahead cache facility is turned off. ¤ For more information on SCSI targets, see the section on device naming conventions in the Solaris 1.x to Solaris 2.x Transition Guide. If you are using the AnswerBook, "scsi targets" is a good search string.
UNIX SOLARIS
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  - I can't read your attachments. What mailer are you using?  SUN
The SunView mailtool andpre-3.3 OpenWindows mailtool produce this message when they cannot cope with an attachment. The attachment is probably in MIME (Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions) format, using base64 encoding.
To read a mail message containing MIME attachments, use mailtool(1) from Solaris 2.3 or later. If you are running an earlier version of Solaris, rlogin(1) to a later version of Solaris, set the DISPLAY environment variable back to the first system, and run mailtool remotely. If those options prove impossible, ask the originator to send the message again using mailtool, or using the CDE dtmail compose File->SendAs- >SunMailTool option. Standard MIME attachments with base64 encoding, for example, produce this message and fail to display in older mailtools. Look into using metamail, available on the Internet, which allows you to send and receive MIME attachments.
UNIX SOLARIS
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  - data access exception  SUN
This message can result from running an old version of the operating system that does not support new hardware, or by running an operating system that is not configured for new hardware. It can also result from incorrectly installed DSIMMs or from a disk problem.
Upgrade your operating system to a version that supports the new hardware or machine architecture. For example, upgrading a SPARCstation 2 (with sun4c kernel architecture) to a SPARCstation 20 (with sun4m kernel architecture) requires an operating system upgrade or reconfiguration. For more information onupgrades, see the section describing system and device configuration in the Solaris 1.x to Solaris 2.x Transition Guide.
UNIX SOLARIS
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  - File table overflow  SUN
The kernel file table is full because too many files are open on the system. Temporarily, no more files can be opened. New data created under this condition will probably be lost.
Simply waiting often gives the system time to close files. However, if this message occurs often, reconfigure the kernel to allow more open files. To increasethe size of the file table in Solaris 2.x, increase the value of maxusers in the /etc/system file. The default maxusers value is the amount of main memory in MB, minus 2. The symbolic name for this error is ENFILE, errno=23.
UNIX SOLARIS
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